Tag Archives: calories

Healthy Tuna & Cheese ‘Noodle’ Bake


✅Under 200 calories,
✅low fat
✅low in carbohydrates 
✅low sugar
✅high protein

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pouch of Slim Noodles – see here
  • 1 Tin of Tuna in spring water
  • 25g low-fat cheddar cheese
  • 200g tinned tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp Total 0% yogurt
  • 0.5 tsp dried Italian herbs
  • 0.5 tsp Salt & Pepper to season
  • 1/2 Onion
  • 40g sweetcorn
  • 1/2 a broccoli
  • Spinach

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DIRECTIONS

  1. Brown the onions in a pan with some water and Fry Light Oil
  2. Boil broccoli and spinach
  3. Drain tuna
  4. Drain broccoli and spinach when cooked
  5. Follow noodle instructions
  6. Mix the herbs, onions,  total 0% and seasoning into the tinned tomatoes
  7. Pour this into a large mixing bowl and mix with the tuna, sweetcorn, veg and noodles
  8. Pour this into a china pasta dish and sprinkle the grated cheese on top
  9. Bake for half an hour , grill for the last 5 mins

Please tweet @_ChloeThomas or email me – chloehthomas@gmail.com your pictures! and comment below any questions.

Share with your friends and family!

Is a Calorie REALLY Just a Calorie?

A calorie, by its simplest definition, is a unit of energy. It’s equivalent to 4.184 absolute Joules.

We’ve all heard that “a calorie is a calorie,” and while there’s truth in this statement, it can lead us astray in our quest to build a great body.

You see, when we’re just talking about mere weight loss or gain, it doesn’t matter where these calories come from. So in this way, a calorie is a calorie. When it comes to PURE weight loss (not factoring in muscle vs. fat, body composition, overall health, physical performance, or energy levels), eating fewer calories than you burn every day will be the main part of the equation. Eat less than you burn: lose weight.

HOWEVER, we’re FAR more concerned with how you look, how you feel, if you are healthy, if you are getting stronger, if your doctor gives you a clean bill of health, and if you live a long life full of activity, exercise, sleeping well etc. You want to do everything in your power to avoid things like heart disease, cancer and type-2 diabetes – diseases that end your life too early.

When we’re talking about improving body composition (losing just body fat and not muscle, or maximizing muscle growth while minimizing fat storage), you must not only follow the principles of energy balance, but you must do so with a proper balance of macronutrients.


A macronutrient is any of the nutritional components of the diet that are required in relatively large amounts: protein, carbohydrate, and fat. How you balance your intake of these macronutrients has profound effects on how your body responds to the foods you eat. For example, protein is the most important macronutrient to get right when you want to optimize your body composition. The research is clear.

A high-protein diet…

-Is vital for preserving lean mass when dieting for fat loss.

-Is vital for maximizing muscle growth when dieting for muscle gain.

-Is effective for reducing body fat levels, including abdominal fat in particular.

-Increases satiety, helping you avoid hunger pangs and cravings.

-A high-protein diet is even more important if you’re exercising regularly, as this further increases your body’s demand for amino acids.

Despite what you’ve been told, carbohydrates aren’t the enemy. They don’t make you fat or unhealthy. In fact, there are big benefits to keeping carbohydrate intake as high as possible, even when dieting for fat loss, including…

-Better workout performance.

-Improved retention of lean mass.

-Better thyroid function.

-More satiety.

-Better mood.

Trust me–low-carb dieting is NOT GOOD and is completely unnecessary for the vast majority of people looking to lose weight, and is downright detrimental to those trying to put on size.

What does the perfect ratio look like?

In my opinion, the amount of calories consumed and the ratio of what the macronutrients should differ from person to person depending upon their body, goals, and routine. A proper meal plan not only provides the proper amount of calories but breaks them down into the optimal amounts of macronutrients as well.

  

I’d love to hear your thoughts:

Have you had success with counting calories or calculating macros, or did it make you go crazy?
Which methods have you messed around with, and what are your goals? Are you trying to lose a few pounds, lose a lot of weight, get to a minimal body fat percentage, compete in an elite sport, etc.

Do you use any apps on your phone to record claories alone or do you include macronutrients? -Has this article made you reconsider? 

I’d love to hear from you – chloehthomas@gmail.com, or message me on facebook- click here

 

 

 

 

 

5 Ways to Combat a Slowing Metabolism

1. Aim to strength train at least 2-3 times per week
(This is the most important tip!). 

Whether you’re a gal or guy, prioritize weight lifting in your exercise plan. Adding muscle mass increases your BMR, allowing you to burn more calories even when you’re not exercising. If you’re a newbie to strength training, send me an email chloehthomas@gmail.com and I’ll help you out.

2. Ramp up the intensity of your aerobic exercise (think running, swimming, biking faster). 

Exercising at higher intensities allows you to reap the benefits of “after burn,” a phenomena where you burn extra calories post-exercise. To benefit from this effect, you should run, jump, dance, swim, bike, etc. at a pace where it’s difficult to talk. If you can push a little harder, then do so.

3. Eat enough protein from high-quality sources. 

High-quality protein sources supply amino acids to your muscles post-exercise so that they can repair and grow. To learn more about what foods contain high levels of protein check out my blog post- List of High Protein Foods & their RDA

4. Stay well hydrated

 Water is important because all of the chemical reactions in your body requires water—including the ones that burn calories. 

5. Don’t starve yourself in order to lose weight. 

You need to consume a moderate amount of calories in order to lose weight. If you eat a significantly low amount of calories, you’ll lose weight rapidly but much of it will be from water and muscle loss. Plus, you’ll likely lose hard-earned muscle mass that’s responsible for maintaining a higher BMR.

 


Is Booze Making You Fat? The Truth About Alcohol & Calories


We don’t burn extra calories to metabolize alcohol – not like we do from digesting carbs, fat and protein. This phenomenon, called the “thermic effect of food”, refers to the energy we use to digest food into small, absorbable components. Because alcohol is so easy to absorb, it enters our bloodstream without burning any extra calories.

Your liver does the dirty work because alcohol is seen as a toxin, the liver prioritizes metabolizing alcohol first which means you won’t be burning calories from other sources while that happens. The liver is only able to clear alcohol at a rate of around one ounce liquor per hour, which is why consuming more than this will leave you feeling tipsy.

Alcohol makes your blood sugar drop, making you want to reach for carbs. The liver helps keep our blood sugar steady, but a liver busy at work metabolizing alcohol can’t do this effectively, causing your blood sugar drops and stays low until the alcohol is metabolised. This explains why you crave carbs and wake up the next day with a headache.

Alcohol calories that aren’t burned will be stored as fat. This is true for all extra calories eaten no matter the source, but what makes alcohol calories worse is that they are stored in your liver first. It takes time for the liver to ship out the alcohol-induced fat for proper storage in your fat cells. If the liver doesn’t do this fast enough (or if you drink too much, too often) the fat stays stuck in your liver and around your abdomen giving you what we refer to jovially as a “beer belly.”

This of course doesn’t mean you need to completely dodge all social sips. Here are some tips to help prevent you from gaining too much of your night out:

1. Pour yourself half as much. This will help you limit yourself to one or two drinks per party.

2. Avoid higher calorie mixed drinks like eggnog, margaritas, mudslides, or other sugary mixed drinks–or have one and consider it dessert.

3. Alternate between having alcohol and water to stay well hydrated.

4. Sip slowly and take the time of enjoy your alcoholic beverage.

5. Keep your alcohol budget at or below 200 calories. 

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Hopefully this will make you think twice when you go out this weekend!

Another way to look at the effect alcohol has on weight loss is to compare the equivalent time you would need to spend doing fitness training to burn these calories off! We’ll assume someone has an average fitness level and is of average weight.

Training time required to burn off calories from alcohol:

Alcoholic drink

Walking

Swimming

Running

Cycling

Beer (355ml)

30 mins

17 mins

12 mins

13 mins

Light beer (355ml)

20 mins

11 mins

8 mins

9 mins

Low carb beer (355ml)

23 mins

13 mins

9 mins

10 mins

White wine sweet (200ml glass)

40 mins

23 mins

16 mins

18 mins

White wine dry (200ml glass)

29 mins

16 mins

12 mins

13 mins

Red wine (200ml glass)

28 mins

16 mins

11 mins

12 mins

Spirits (on ice / neat)

13 mins

7 mins

5 mins

6 mins

Water

0 mins

0 mins

0 mins

0 mins


Mouthwatering Healthy Protein Pancakes 

Yes it’s true, these pancakes ARE healthy, low in fat, calories and high in protein which means they keep you fuller for longer! I’ve used juice plus complete protein powder which is gluten, wheat and dairy free and suitable for vegans and used by 3 Olympic teams and many athletes around the world.image

Prep time –5 mins

Cook time  –10 mins

Total time – 15 mins

Ingredients:

1 tsp baking soda

1/3 Cup instant oats, dry

2 scoops vanilla or chocolate protein (juice plus) powder

2 egg whites

1/2 cup fat free Greek yogurt (0% total)

1/2 small banana (old)

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1-2 tbsp unsweetened almond milk

Low calorie nonstick oil spray

Instructions:

1. In a blender, combine the oats, protein powder, egg whites, 1/4 cup Greek yogurt, banana, and cinnamon. Blend until smooth.

2. In a large skillet coated with spray oil, begin cooking the pancakes over medium-high heat, about 4-5 minutes on each side.

3. Serve immediately or let them cool and place in a Tupperware box. You can freeze half the batch as well in separate ziplock bags. Make sure they are defrosted before serving.

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Serving suggestions 

Best served warm (heat up in microwave or oven) with

-Total 0% Greek yoghurt & some strawberries / raspberries / blueberries

– organic almond or cashew nut butter & sliced banana 

– homemade frozen banana yoghurt and some cinnamon 

– Greek yoghurt a 2 tsps agave nectar syrup 

For more information on juice plus click here –http://www.juiceplus.co.uk/+ct53247

CALORIES DONT COUNT TIME! 

Health topic of the week

“Late-night eating promotes weight gain”

“Never Eat Before Bed”

Can a late-night dinner ruin a day’s worth of healthy eating? It’s time to find out.

This myth stems from the long-rumored belief that you should stop eating two hours before you go to sleep. Has any reputable expert ever stated that this myth is fact? 

NO, simply because it’s a bunch of B.S(!). You don’t gain more fat from the calories you consume if you eat them at 9 p.m. versus 7 p.m. Like I the title says- calories don’t tell time! You will consume the same amount of calories whether you eat them earlier or later, and your body will digest those calories the exact same way.

Fact: It is not about what TIME you eat, but WHAT you eat that matters. If the meal that you eat late at night consists of healthy food, then you don’t need to worry about anything. Eating a bucket of ice cream instead of a bowl of salad anytime of the day will promote weight gain. Eating protein before bedtime can help you sleep well and gain muscle mass.

Research

“They found no link between when the animals ate and whether or not they put on weight.

Speaking at a Society for Neuroscience meeting in New Orleans, the scientists said claims that eating late lead to weight gain may be “an urban myth”. Dr Judy Cameron and colleagues came across the finding almost by accident.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Weight Control Information Network web site, “it does not matter what time of day you eat. It is what and how much you eat and how much physical activity you do during the whole day that determines whether you gain, lose, or maintain your weight.”

So remember there’s nothing wrong with eating a light, healthy snack after dinner as long as you plan for it as part of your daily calories. To keep from overeating, pay attention to your food while eating, avoid eating in front of the TV, and choose a portion-controlled snack. 

People eat at night for a variety of reasons that often have little to do with hunger, from satisfying cravings to coping with boredom or stress. And after-dinner snacks tend not to be controlled. They often consist of large portions of high-calorie foods (like chips, cookies, candy), eaten while sitting in front of the television or computer. In this situation, it’s all too easy to consume the entire bag, carton, or container before you realize it. Besides those unnecessary extra calories, eating too close to bedtime can cause indigestion and sleeping problems.

When you’re trying to lose weight, eat regular meals and consume 90% of your calories before 8 p.m. The benefit of eating meals every three to four hours is it helps regulate your blood sugar, and thus control hunger and cravings. *

The Bottom Line: 

More research is needed on humans to determine whether calories eaten at night are more likely to cause weight gain than those eaten early in the day. 

You’ll consume the same amount of calories whenever you decide to eat — yet when some people eat late at night, they’re more likely to over eat and skip breakfast the next day. Keep that in mind and plan your meals out ahead of time, and avoid overeating by stopping eating when you are full!

And remember the truth: It doesn’t matter what time you eat — the only thing that matters is the AMOUNT of calories you’re consuming.

*http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/diet-truth-myth-eating-night-causes-weight-gain

 

Frozen Yoghurt – Not as healthy as you think

Alice Mackintosh, a nutrition consultant at The Food Doctor says: ‘Even if frozen yogurts are fat-free, if they are high in sugar, your body may take the sugar and store it as fat. They don’t offer much nutritional value, and should not be mistaken for a healthy snack.’ The probiotic element is in too low a concentration to have much impact, she adds.

New York-based nutritionist Lana Masor explains: ‘There are two things in this world that make food taste really good — fat and sugar — so if something claims to be fat-free but it tastes delicious, you can bet that it is loaded with sugar.’

NUTRITIONAL VALUE

Since the difference in the ingredients of ice cream and frozen yogurt is cream, the main nutritional difference is the fat content. One cup of regular vanilla ice cream contains 275 calories, 5 grams of protein, 31 grams of carbohydrates, 15 grams of fat and 9 grams of saturated fat. One cup of regular vanilla frozen yogurt contains 221 calories, 5 grams of protein, 38 grams of carbohydrates, 6 grams of fat and 4 grams of saturated fat.

Several of the frozen yogurt cups also contain both artificial and natural ingredients — the former is chemically made, while the latter comes from some place in nature (though not necessarily something you’d typically think of as food; for example, some natural berry flavors might come from castoreum, an extract from beaver perineal glands).

So how to make sense of a confusing label? Here’s Nestle’s rule: “If it has more than five ingredients, or you don’t recognize the ingredient as a food, leave it.”
Some of the ingredient lists above top 10-plus items — and that’s for the seemingly simple “tart” flavors, not the oh-so-tempting birthday cake variety. And yup, that’s before loading on the toppings.

The Best Frozen Yogurt Is the One You Make Yourself!!!

HONEY PEACH FROZEN YOGHURT

INGREDIENTS

3 ripe peaches, peeled and cut into chunks. (about 3 cups of cut fruit and you can use a mix of white and yellow)
¼ cup honey
2 ½ cups Fage Greek yogurt

METHOD

With a blender or a hand blender, puree peaches.
Add, honey and yogurt and puree more.
Pour contents into ice cream maker and turn on for 25 to 30 minutes, until mixture is stiff and bunching into the blades.
Remove all frozen yogurt from ice cream maker and store it in another container.
Freeze for an additional 2 hours. Serve.

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FROZEN STRAWBERRY YOGHURT

INGREDIENTS

140g strawberries
½ x 405g can light condensed milk
500g tub 0%-fat Greek yogurt

METHOD

Roughly chop half the strawberries and whizz the rest in a food processor or with a stick blender to a purée.
In a big bowl, stir the condensed milk into the puréed strawberries then gently stir in the yogurt until well mixed.
Fold through the chopped strawberries.
Scrape the mixture into a loaf tin or container, pop on the lid or wrap well in cling film and freeze overnight, until solid.
Remove from the freezer about 10-15 mins before you want to serve the frozen yogurt.
Can be frozen for up to 1 month.

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Do you really know what the labels organic, natural, low calorie or healthy really means?

Fresh, Natural, Organic – What Do All These Labels Really Mean?

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What Does “Natural” Mean?

In a short answer nothing. The term natural has no FDA guideline behind it. The information taken directly from their site states the following: “The FDA has not developed a definition for use of the term natural or its derivatives. However, the agency has not objected to the use of the term if the food does not contain added color, artificial flavors, or synthetic substances.”

So while the foods can’t include synthetic ingredients, they can be heavily processed, such as animals raised with antibiotics and growth hormones. High fructose syrup (sometimes referred to as corn sugar) is a natural substance, but producing it from raw corn requires a number of processing steps.

What Does “Organic” Mean?

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According to the USDA there are three categories for the term organic:

100 percent organic –
Foods that don’t contain any non-organic ingredients can be labeled as “100 percent organic”.

Organic
Foods can be labeled simply “organic” if they contain 95 percent organic ingredients, and the other 5 percent does not contain growth hormones.

Made with organic ingredients –
Foods that have at least 70 percent organically produced ingredients can use the term “made with organic ingredients”. That’s right – up to 30 percent of the contents could be non-organic.

The Difference Between Healthy and Low Calorie Foods

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Low calorie foods are often thought to be healthy, and people often assume the opposite is also true – that high-calorie foods are unhealthy. The amount of calories in food is not necessarily linked to how healthy that food is.

What does healthy actually mean?

Something that is healthy will help maintain or improve your physical or mental condition.

A food source that is healthy will have good short-term and long-term effects for your mind and/or body. Conversely, something that is unhealthy will have bad short-term and long-term effects for your mind or body.

Why high calorie foods can be thought to be unhealthy

There is a catch. Everyone is different, with different body types and activity levels requiring a different amount of energy each day, so a healthy amount of calories for one person may be an unhealthy amount of calories to consume for another person.

Being overweight with excessive body fat can have many long term health risks, including diabetes, heart disease, and certain cancers. Therefore, you must eat a diet with a specific caloric intake that enables you to stay at a healthy weight for your body type. In this case low calorie foods and meals must be eaten in order to be healthy.

If you focus on eating whole foods most of the time, you should end up eating fewer calories without eating a smaller quantity of food. To get the maximum benefit, choose foods with low calorie density to allow yourself to increase food intake whilst reducing caloric intake. Overall, improving your food choices and eating better food for weight loss is a much more sustainable lifestyle choice than simply reducing the quantity of food you are eating.

Do you regularly read the ingredient panel on food products you purchase? Did you know what these terms really meant? http://www.naturalnews.com/”

http://traineatgain.com/difference-healthy-low-calorie-foods/

Why low fat foods can end up making you fat!!

I wanted to share this post from Traineatgain because people assume that a product with the world low fat on mean it’s healthy!
In fact this is not always the case – a lot of the time it’s worse for you than the normal product. And this is where you get conned and even end up spending more money!
So make sure you always compare labels to the original person and look at per 100grams not just the fat but sugars, sweeteners and calories.

This great link explains more
http://traineatgain.com/why-low-fat-foods-stop-fat-loss/

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Happy to gain weight!

I am so happy – i weighed myself yesterday for first time since i started my weight gaining/healthy eating/gluten free diet which was back in April- when i saw the nutritionist.

I have gained 8KG (about 17lbs)!!!!!

I am so happy as this has not been all fat, it has been muscle as well.

  • I have not eaten any ‘junk’ food or processed ‘rubbish’ (sorry but it is!) .
  • I have been to the gym EVERYDAY (well nearly, excluding illness and photoshoots/catwalk shows). Sometimes twice – once for cardio and again later for strength training.
  • I have increased portion sizes, I decreased my cardio for one month (its now normal again), and increased healthy fats – eg, avocados, salmon, all nuts, organic nut butter, seeds.
  • Gluten and wheat free products are also higher in calories and fat anyway (eg. a lice of bread has twice the amount of fat and sugar compared to standard slice of bread, like Hovis or Kingsmill).

Now for my next challenge….finding the balance!

i have been eating well over what i need each day – which has shown on my body and the scales. So i now i would like to ‘settle’ at this weight which basically means taking each days as it comes– if i start losing weight again i know i need to increase my food. And if i keep gaining weight i will decrease my portion sizes and increase exercise. I will not be going back to any low fat products though- i now know what damage they have done to my body.