Tag Archives: love

Healthy Tuna & Cheese ‘Noodle’ Bake


✅Under 200 calories,
✅low fat
✅low in carbohydrates 
✅low sugar
✅high protein

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INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pouch of Slim Noodles – see here
  • 1 Tin of Tuna in spring water
  • 25g low-fat cheddar cheese
  • 200g tinned tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp Total 0% yogurt
  • 0.5 tsp dried Italian herbs
  • 0.5 tsp Salt & Pepper to season
  • 1/2 Onion
  • 40g sweetcorn
  • 1/2 a broccoli
  • Spinach

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DIRECTIONS

  1. Brown the onions in a pan with some water and Fry Light Oil
  2. Boil broccoli and spinach
  3. Drain tuna
  4. Drain broccoli and spinach when cooked
  5. Follow noodle instructions
  6. Mix the herbs, onions,  total 0% and seasoning into the tinned tomatoes
  7. Pour this into a large mixing bowl and mix with the tuna, sweetcorn, veg and noodles
  8. Pour this into a china pasta dish and sprinkle the grated cheese on top
  9. Bake for half an hour , grill for the last 5 mins

Please tweet @_ChloeThomas or email me – chloehthomas@gmail.com your pictures! and comment below any questions.

Share with your friends and family!

Cheat days. Are you doing more damage than good?

Are “cheat days” a good idea? Do these special days of indulgence help you reach your health goals? Or do they set you up on a seesaw of destructive eating habits?

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The Argument FOR Cheat Days: 

Rewarding Yourself-

Some say that giving yourself days of indulgence is giving yourself a needed break from your diet. These cheat days are a relief valve that help you stick to healthier foods.

The logic behind these days has more than a few flaws, and it’s due to the psychology and physiology behind them…..

The Argument AGAINST Cheat Days

⛔️The Name Is to Blame….The problem with “cheat” is that it carries a huge emotional weight of guilt, shame, and failure. 

“Cheat” is not a positive word. When you talk about “cheating” on a diet the same way you’d “cheat on” a partner, you’re adding a massive load of moral judgment that has no business being attached to a burger or a piece of cake, because your “relationship” with your diet is fundamentally different from your relationship with a spouse or partner.

Think about “cheating” in the context of a relationship. If you cheat on your husband or wife, it’s wrong because it’s hurting the other person, betraying their trust and breaking a promise.

Treating a person this way would make you a sociopath, but when it comes to food, this is a perfectly normal and healthy attitude. And that’s why using a word with moral connotations like “cheat” doesn’t make sense.

What’s more, when we deem certain foods “bad” or “cheating,” the negative name doesn’t help us pump the breaks.

⛔️When a food is off-limits, it can develop a specific, emotional charge. You begin obsessing over it, fantasizing about, and looking forward to that ‘indulge day’ all week. Then, when you finally have access to it, you overeat.

Separating foods into ‘good’ and ‘bad’ categories encourages you to associate eating with guilt and shame. This means that instead of enjoying everything we eat, we feel bad about ourselves when we eat something we consider “bad.”

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⛔️Furthermore Science shows when we think something is healthy, we’re not concerned with portion control and thus overdo it—whether it’s a “normal” day or a “cheat” day. Yes, there can be too much of a good thing.

The problem now becomes: what word to use instead? Call it a treat, a detour, a “free day/free meal” or a non-healthy meal. Or just call it “part of the way I choose to eat” and leave it at that.

Once you stop making food into a moral issue, it becomes much easier to sit down and think rationally about whether (and if so, when) it makes sense for you personally to eat something that isn’t healthy.

⛔️Attack of the Calories

Those who assume they can compensate for giving into temptations—say, by holding themselves back on all days except their cheat days—are actually less likely to reach their dietary goals. This is because they’re more likely to consume a greater number of calories, not just on their cheat day but on the days following it.

Restricting ourselves throughout the week and then slamming our bodies with sugar and fat once our cheat day rolls around, can have “a massive impact on blood sugar and insulin levels. You’ll wake up the next day craving more sugars and simple carbs, and you’ll find yourself feeling pretty ragged. And if you repeatedly increase your caloric intake above baseline, you may inadvertently end up gaining more weight over time.

Cravings serve as a sign that your nutritional approach isn’t sound. Most cravings come from overly restricting your food intake, using food as a drug, or over exercising.

⛔️Binging Leads to Extra Cheat Days

Once that day of indulgence comes, it’s not about enjoying the foods you haven’t had all week. Instead, you’re approaching it out of a need to consume all you can before the day goes away. “It feeds into a feast-and-famine cycle,”.

Binging on a cheat day also makes it challenging to confine cheat-day foods only to that designated 24-hour window. It’s very hard for people to compartmentalize their diets. ‘I’m only going to have those cookies on Saturday’ can easily spill over into ‘I’ll only have a few cookies Sunday too.’

 

✳️The Solution: Stop Restricting, Start Enjoying—in Moderation✳️

So if cheat days don’t work, are we all better off eating whatever we want, whenever we want?

Well, not quite, following a healthy diet means including a number of foods—all of which are consumed in moderation. If weight loss is the goal, this usually means three square meals a day with planned snacks, incorporating treats but in smaller portion sizes.

Research suggests eating a balance of foods—with none of them off-limits or labeled “bad”—is the best way to reduce the kinds of cravings that can lead to a binge.

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So what does a game plan for a healthy eating with no cheat days look like? 

➡️Remember these 3 things:

1.✅Listen to your appetite.

If you want to eat spaghetti and meatballs for dinner, have it! Don’t find the low-carb version with the fat-free sauce. If you actually eat what you want, you’ll likely end up eating a more reasonable amount of it.

Eating in tune with your hunger is a principle of intuitive eating, and it’s shown to have a positive effect on both your weight and your wellbeing.

2. ✅Enjoy treats from time to time.

Research shows (and experts agree) that sprinkling reasonably sized desserts or treats into your daily diet encourages you to find pleasure in meal time again—and that pleasure will help ensure you don’t feel the need to go overboard.

So instead of confining your treats to one single day, drop them into places throughout the week.

3. ✅Savor every bite.

Once you place any item of food into your mouth, take a moment to: taste, smell, and experience it as a whole. When you take the time to be mindful about what you’re eating, you tap into your satiety cues.

Forget about designating a cheat day to reward yourself. Denying yourself most of the week and then indulging like crazy on your one day “off,” just promotes guilt, anxiety, and shame around eating—which means you won’t likely get to the health outcome you’re looking for. Instead, make every day a great day by listening to your appetite, periodically adding in some of your favorite foods in small portions, and savoring each and every bite of everything you eat. This sustainable approach will help you think of all of your eating as enjoyable, and that’s what gets you down the road to where you want to be.

✅”Calories in vs. calories out” is the golden rule for effective weight loss. To lose weight, a person must eat fewer calories than he or she burns. 

You are not a quitter! You are not a cheater! 

If you feel the need or desire to “cheat” on your diet, it may be worth examining your relationship with food and whether you’re actually taking steps to leave dieting behind in favor of adopting a healthy eating plan that you can live with for life.

Please feel free to email me – click here. Or leave a comment below on whether cheat days work for you – I would love to hear your story.

Baked Cinnamon Honey or Sea Salt & Vinegar Crisps

IMG_2611Ingredients:

1 Tbsp Vinegar

1 Tsp Sea Salt

1 Tsp Ground cinnamon  

1 Tsp Honey

2 Small Sweet Potatoes 

 

Directions

1.Mix the honey and cinnamon together on half the batch for a sweet flavour

2. For the salt & vinegar,  shake up the sea salt and vinegar with the sweet potatoes in a ziploc/airtight bag.

Try a Greek Yogurt dip (total 0%) to go with these.

 

 

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Taken from a great blog – Undressed skeleton, click HERE to see more  

 

 

Mashed Avocado Egg Salad

Simple mashed avocado egg salad makes an excellent spread for ryvita or with a salad for lunch. It also tastes great with a jacket potato on those days when you’ve got too many plans to really cook. 

The blend of creamy avocado and mashed eggs is spiced up with zesty lemon and dijon mustard so chances are you won’t miss the mayonnaise- or the processed calories!

  

The avocado blended with the egg gives a high level of protein keeping you fuller for longer and the avocado contains healthy days and vitamin E- good for hair & nails!

Ingredients

4 large hard boiled eggs, cooled and peeled

0.5 avocado (about 100g)

1 tsp Dijon mustard

0.5 of a small lime or lemon, juiced

Salt & pepper to taste

Optional Toppings & Garnishes

Sliced tomatoes

Lettuce leaves

Sprinkle of fresh parsley

Herb spices

Extra sea salt

Directions

1. Add hard boiled eggs, avocado, dijon mustard, lime/lemon juice, and salt and pepper to a small bowl and mash with the back of a fork until fully combined.

2. If desired, serve on a slice of toasted bread with tomato, lettuce, a sprinkle of fresh herbs or dried spices, and a pinch of coarse sea salt. Can also be served on a bed of lettuce.

3. Serve immediately and eat the same day you prepare it.

 

Nutrition Information- Serves: 2, Serving Size: 1/2 egg salad,

Per serving: Calories: 205; Total Fat: 14g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Monounsaturated Fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 370mg; Sodium: 348mg; Carbohydrate: 5g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugar: 0g; Protein: 13g

NOTE: Nutrition information doesn’t include bread and optional toppings and garnishes. 

How To Completely Change Your Habits

21 days to a new habit.

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Recently i have been doing #onesimplechange with my clients. It is 21 days of doing a healthy habit. Anything from 20mins meditation/day , reading to cutting out fizzy drinks or squats!

Research shows that it takes 21 days to develop a habit. That’s 21 days of going to the gym every day or exercising in some way every day, 21 days to meditation, 21 days to eat healthily, 21 days doing, 21 days of anything! The aim of one simple change is that it is a healthy habit that is easy and simple to start/change. 

When you want to start a habit, don’t tell yourself you are doing it for life, tell yourself (your conscious brain) that you are going to try it for 21 days. Then when you have completed this for 21 days your conscious mind has the choice of stopping it or carrying on, or so it thinks. Your neural pathways have formed already and you will more than likely continue with your new habit, you will have seen the benefits along the way your unconscious will want to continue if it has been beneficial. This can also work when trying to break a habit, however research has shown that the neural pathways to any habit could be lifelong and a cue or a trigger can cause us to start back up an old habit, like smoking.

This is not a bad thing; we just have to be aware of our thoughts when we have given up a habit such as smoking or drinking fizzy drinks.

When starting or breaking any habit we tend to tell our conscious mind we are going to change and it’s for life. The trouble is your conscious mind will just say ‘is that right? I’m in charge here, I’ll decide’ so there will be a battle between your two sides of your conscious mind.

If you tell your mind you want to try something for 21 days it won’t be so unwilling to co-operate. We all know we have conversations with ourselves, should I go to the pub should I not, should I go to the gym should I not. There are a hundred conversations we have with ourselves everyday!

When we want to start something or give up something, smoking for example, you might normally say to yourself ‘right that’s it I’m giving up for good’. Immediately your brain kicks in and says no smoking for life, and then it starts to think of all the situations it likes a good cigarette in; first thing in the morning with a cup of coffee, going out for a drink at night, at work when you’re a bit stressed, just after sex etc. Your brain thinks ‘lack of’ instead of the benefits of. It can’t really think as clearly about the benefits because it hasn’t yet had the benefits of giving up smoking but it knows the supposed pleasures that smoking brings.

So what one simple change can we start for 21 days?

Keep a Gratitude Journal 

Give up sweets 

Read 10 pages of a personal development book a day 

Meditate for 20 mins/day

30 squats a day

Write in the blog every day for 

Go to bed before 10:30pm

Get up before 6am 

Exchange my daily coffee for a daily lemon tea

Drink 2.5litres of water a day 

Replace breakfast for a Juice Plus Complete protein shake

Take Juice Plus capsules every morning

I’ve been asking my clients to download this fantastic free app for you to track your change. It counts the days for you and each day you click complete when you have done your change: CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE APP

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Remember, sustaining change is always easier – and much more fun – when you have friends along for the journey. They’ll keep you accountable, encourage you through the hard times and cheer you on from the front lines. Click here for more info on Juice Plus onesimplechange

Please comment below with what onesimplechange you are going to make starting this week and let me know your progress! Good luck!