Tag Archives: Pasta

I love pasta. Can I eat it and still lose weight?

Yes! Of course you can eat pasta and lose weight, provided of course, you keep your portion size in check and it’s not stuffed with meat or smothered with cheese or Alfredo sauce.

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By itself, pasta is a nutritious food. It contains almost no fat, cholesterol and sodium and is an excellent source of low glycemic carbohydrates. Foods with a low glycemic index are broken down slowly in the body and release their carbohydrate (glucose) gradually into the bloodstream. As a result, they can help you feel full longer after eating.
https://chloewellbeing.wordpress.com/2013/06/24/explanation-of-good-and-bad-carbs/

Research shows that most people lose the same amount of weight whether they follow a low-carb, lowfat or Mediterranean diet. That’s because calories matter most: Eat too many calories (from bread, pasta or anything else) and you’ll gain weight; eat less than you burn and you’ll lose weight.
The catch: Starchy carbs are high in calories, so you have to keep serving sizes small—but many people find it all too easy to go overboard on pasta, potatoes, rice and even the better-for-you whole grains like whole-wheat pasta or brown rice.
So, how much pasta can you eat if you’re trying to lose weight?
Click here to follow the correct guidelines-
https://chloewellbeing.wordpress.com/2014/10/05/why-youre-not-loosing-weight/

Ideally, top your pasta with tomato sauce which is low in calories and fat and a good source of vitamins A and C. Tomato sauce is also an excellent source of lycopene, an antioxidant linked with protection from certain cancers. If you’re using a store-bought pasta sauce, look for a product with no more than 70 calories, 1 gram saturated fat and 350 milligrams of sodium per one-half cup serving.

To help you feel satisfied, be sure to include protein in your pasta sauce – lean ground turkey, chicken breast, shrimp, white kidney beans, and so on. Bulk up your sauce by adding plenty of vegetables,such as chopped zucchini, bell peppers, mushrooms, rapini and baby spinach.

Carbohydrates in Your Diet

When deciding what carbohydrates to eat, don’t worry about whether or not they are classified as simple or complex carbohydrates. Instead, try to ensure that you are getting your carbohydrates from minimally processed vegetable, fruit, bean, and whole grain sources. Carbohydrates from these sources are ideal because they have high vitamin, mineral, phytonutrient, and fiber contents, so they are not only providing your necessary caloric energy but they are also delivering a significant amount of additional healthy nutrients that are lost in the more refined and processed carbohydrates (i.e. in carbohydrate sources like white flour, table sugar, white rice, fruit juices, sodas, cookies, cakes, jams, etc…).

Generally speaking, carbohydrates from vegetables, fruits, beans, and whole grains are digested slower, which allows you to feel satiated for a longer period of time and reduces spikes in blood glucose levels, which are associated with increased risk for diabetes and heart and weight problems. Some examples of how to choose your carbohydrates are as follows:

-Try to increase the relative proportions of fruits and vegetables in your diet
-When eating bread choose whole wheat bread rather than white bread
-When eating pasta choose whole wheat pasta rather than regular pasta
-When eating rice choose brown rice rather than white rice
-At breakfast try eating oatmeal, preferably steel-cut oats, or perhaps quinoa, rather than your normal breakfast cereal.

Here are some yummy low-carb alternative recipes

Delicious Zucchini Lasagna

http://theturquoisehome.com/2013/10/delicious-zucchini-lasagna/

Mac-and-Cheese-Style Cauliflower
Get all the creamy, cheesy goodness of mac and cheese—without the high starch content of macaroni.

http://www.vegetariantimes.com/recipe/mac-and-cheese-style-cauliflower/

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Why you’re not loosing weight

It sounds so simple: Don’t eat or drink too much. But looks can be deceiving. It’s easy to eat or drink more than you planned to.

A 2004 study of 329 overweight people found that 38% of those who practiced portion control for two years lost 5% or more of body weight, compared with 33% of participants who did not (they gained 5% or more of body weight).

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How to Measure Portion Sizes of Pasta, Rice and Couscous

Most of us are guilty of cooking too much when it comes to starches. And when we do try to cook less, it somehow ends up not being enough. It’s very hard to get it just right, so how much, in dry weight, should be sufficient per person? Of course it all depends on whether the pasta, rice or couscous is meant to be for a first course or a main course, how hungry you and your family or guests are, and whether or not you want leftovers. But let’s take a look at the average portion sizes used worldwide.

Rice
When it comes to rice the norm seems to be about ½ cup (90g) per person, although some people prefer to use a bit less – about 1/3 cup (60g) per person. And remember we are talking about uncooked rice here, which means that when it’s cooked it’s usually about a cup per person, as rice doubles in size. For a main meal this is definitely enough!

Pasta
As a general guide, you should allow 75g dried pasta, 115g-150g fresh pasta or 175g-200g filled pasta (such as ravioli) per person. The same rule applies to all types of pasta – whether it’s spaghetti, penne, rigatoni or elbows. 70-80 grams of dry pasta turns into a satisfyingly deep-dish plateful. A mound is too much, because it will leave no space for the rest of the meal. When it comes to spaghetti a measuring stick is available to buy in most homeware shops, or you could order one online. This measuring tool has different sized holes from one upwards, and you put in whatever amount passes through the hole to match the amount of servings.

Couscous
Couscous is perhaps less popular than rice and pasta, but is slowly but surely becoming more widely used. A general rule is that 100g couscous per person is sufficient. But of course this also depends on what you are serving it with. 1 cup dry couscous makes 2 – 2 ½ cups cooked couscous. As a side dish, plan on ½ to ¾ cup cooked couscous per person.

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SOURCE

http://www.justeasyrecipes.co.za/2009/08/24/how-to-measure-portion-sizes-of-pasta-rice-and-couscous/

Gluten-Free Living on a Budget Tips

This is taken from (I have edited it!) a great blog – check out these Budget tips when on a gluten free diet …

http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.co.uk/2009/03/cooking-gluten-free-on-budget-brown.html

Gluten-Free Living on a Budget Tips

  1. Buy pantry items on sale. 

Beans. Rice. Canned tomatoes. Canned pumpkin. Quinoa. Gluten-free pasta. Stock up when you can. And buy in bulk.

  1. Eat more vegetarian and vegan meals. 

Cut down on meat and browse my Vegetarian and Vegan Index for some budget-friendly inspiration. My Sweet Potato Black Bean Enchiladas are super popular- and muy delicioso. Not to mention my Vegetarian Shepherd’s Pie and the all-time classic comfort food Baked Mac + Cheese.

Shop at the Farmers’ market for seasonal inspiration and budget friendly prices.

  1. Make your own snacks instead of buying pre-packaged. 

You can make twice as much hummus for less than half the price. Try my Jalapeno Lime Hummus recipe, or classic Hummus Tahini. Make your own snack chips out of stale corn tortillas and brown rice tortillas- here’s how to make your own chips. Easy. Make your own pesto, too. And if basil is outrageously expensive- try cilantro, parsley and mint. It makes a wonderful pesto with pecans (cheaper than pine nuts).

  1. Use more potatoes. 

They’re amazingly versatile. You can make a soul warming- and filling- soup Potato Leek Soup for very little investment. You can make a baked Idaho potato- or a sweet potato- the centre of a meal rather than a side dish. Top it with a scoop of leftover Santa Fe Chicken Chili, or veggies like my Balsamic Roasted Veggie Smothered Potato. Top a baked sweet potato with my Melted Peppers and Dags. Easy and cheap. Buy them at your local Farmers Market.

 

  1. Eat breakfast for dinner .

Make an 1-2-3 omelette with eggs and left over blue corn chips and call it a Blue Chip Fritatta. Make pancakes. Or Pumpkin Waffles. Or a simple Fried Egg and Pesto on Toast. Bake up a spaghetti quiche-pie with leftover pasta and veggies and call it an Autumn Pasta Fritatta. Find more brunch, quiche and egg recipes here.

  1. Pasta is goddess sent. 

Even though gluten-free pasta runs a tad more expensive than regular old grocery store spaghetti, you can often buy in bulk and save. Ask your grocer for a case discount.

  1. Make soup. 

And if you make it a slow cooker, you save energy costs. Easy, And pretty cheap- if you buy the beans on sale. Use leftover chicken and make my Roasted Corn Chowder with Chicken and Cilantro. Hardly a sacrifice. Browse more soup recipes on the blog.

  1. Make your own broth

Don’t bother buying expensive gluten-free broths. Make your own with water. Fill a pot. Toss in some old celery sticks that have been hanging around, a couple of bendy carrots, a piece of onion, some garlic and a shake of herbs. Sea salt. Cover. Simmer. Strain. Boom. Broth. And you know what’s in it.

 

  1. Remix leftovers. 

Don’t just reheat  leftovers in the microwave. Get creative with leftover rice, quinoa, stews and chili. Combine leftover veggies and chicken for soup. Throw in leftover salad greens. Toss in some carrots. Add a scoop of rice. Save leftover chili (like my Two Artists Chili) and bake it with rice the next day for a fabulous Baked Chili Casserole (pictured above). Make a fabulous Brown Sugar Meatloaf and smashed potatoes and the next day turn leftovers into a tasty pie (see below for recipes). Make a potato soup into a fish chowder the next day by adding a can of wild salmon and some frozen corn. Use leftover rice and chicken and add some garlic and frozen spinach to make my Chicken Spinach Rice Bake. And of course- the obvious favorite around here- make Mexican. Use leftover chicken, beef or turkey to make enchiladas.

Read more: http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/2009/03/cooking-gluten-free-on-budget-brown.html#ixzz2WV4px3Jb